"It’s just that, for a certain type of kid, growing up in a certain type of place. You need to fight, and you need to muscle, and you need to make noise in order to be heard."
"I can see, that even though my Nan was separated from her family, that we do have a lot of things that are culturally in line with being Aboriginal, and I don’t know how she just naturally grew up with those ideas, when she taken away so young, but she did. So I guess, I feel like a fraud either way, I don’t know which box to tick."
"Motherhood wasn’t something I enjoyed or embraced. I guess, you know, many Sri Lankan women do, so I thought it was something wrong with me. Yeah, so that was a catalyst for me, because I questioned–at 25 I didn’t know it was okay that I’m different, so I thought something was wrong with me, that this is part, half of who I am, but I could not relate, I did not belong, I did not make any connection to the Tamil of me, and as I said the women in particular. They were very nurturing, very ‘homemaker’ you know, but it didn’t resonate with me, it didn’t resonate with what I stood for, what I expected, what I enjoyed in life."
"I think identity is developed from what’s passed down to you, and how you interpret it, and how you implement it into your life, so I feel like there was a missing piece in my life, because I never got those experiences."
"Because my family is so dynamic and so different, and also growing up in a different country and then coming somewhere else as well, those two differing kind of like ideas of womanhood, they shaped the way that I view womanhood to be gentle but not submissive."
"I think a lot of them thought that I had changed completely different person because I put a piece of cloth on my head and I re-found connection to God. I’m exactly the same person, maybe just a little bit more cynical. But I’m definitely a lot more ‘me’ than I used to be."
"It’s so disarming, it’s so peaceful, there’s a joy that comes in creating that it’s not so much about the end product, but the product represents this moment that you’ve had with people around you."
"Simply: white Australia tries to push itself or lengthen its distance of ignorance..."
"The attitudes towards women aspiring to be orthopaedic surgeons is shameful. Many men in the fraternity have to travel some distance to arrive into the 21st century."
"This idea of liminality, of negotiating and mapping spaces between Singapore and Australia, between home and elsewhere, is something that has given me a new direction and focus..."
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