"I remember in my childhood I had a very creative imagination and I'd make up dramatic stories in my head that I'd play out in our backyard. I also loved reading...all genres—horror (R.L. Stine), mystery (Nancy Drew), and series like Babysitters Club."
For me, storytelling is the ability to share small, significant moments in a way that makes them intimate and immediate to whoever hears them.
"Having migrated to Australia at a young age, I was able to get a better understanding of who my parents were, where I’m from, and learn more about my culture through story telling. It has revealed another aspect of my identity to me, that I may have otherwise been unaware of."
"Facilitating exposes me to the creative juices of other people, and that informs and inspires my own writing. I see the whole mutable and organic mix as a community in which we’re all learning, rather than me being some kind of expert imparting knowledge. We all always have something to learn."
"Telling stories is how I make sense of the world. When I look back, I can almost see myself trying to work through a sense of panic, or a sense of not understanding, or an old hurt."
"Listening to other women’s stories really helped me to see my identity isn’t as straightforward as I thought it was. I’m a lot clearer about what I need to understand."
"The arts isn’t a commodity, it is an experience. It’s essential to remember this if wanting to engage with new audiences."
"I think being able to tell a story is a very beautiful thing."
"I’ve seen emerging writers nurtured by the belief of other people. I’ve continued to learn that people are gloriously different. I’ve experienced pleasure, frustration, surprise, pride, and the therapeutic effects of laughter."
"To me, storytelling is about finding ways to connect threads, or rather illuminate the threads that already connect us."
© 2019 Centre for Stories / Site by Super Minimal