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After living a big life abroad, 2020 forced Garick Lee back home to his childhood home, his childhood bedroom, and thoughts of his childhood self.
The distance through the pandemic has made Saadia Ahmed realise that although she’s many things – a writer, a feminist, an activist, a friend to many – an important part of her identity is that she's Fizza's big sister.
"My grandmother and my grandfather's Country tells a lot of stories. So that's why I want to take photographs of Millstream, of the Country, we call it 'Ngurra' in language. It's significant to my people. Because they have a way of telling their own story."
Sandi had always kept her biological father at arm's length. As she grew older, their relationship changed.
When Eduardo began working as a criminal defence attorney in Brazil, he noticed something striking about his clients – they reminded him a lot of himself.
When Sankari moved away from home in her twenties, she quickly found her confidence through self-expression. A spontaneous haircut lead to another, and then another, and another more. It didn't take long before she realised the implications of her actions and had to deal with the consequences.
"I can see, that even though my Nan was separated from her family, that we do have a lot of things that are culturally in line with being Aboriginal, and I don’t know how she just naturally grew up with those ideas, when she taken away so young, but she did. So I guess, I feel like a fraud either way, I don’t know which box to tick."
"Motherhood wasn’t something I enjoyed or embraced. I guess, you know, many Sri Lankan women do, so I thought it was something wrong with me. So that was a catalyst for me...at 25 I didn’t know it was okay that I’m different...I could not relate, I did not belong, I did not make any connection to the Tamil of me, and as I said the women in particular.
"I think identity is developed from what’s passed down to you, and how you interpret it, and how you implement it into your life, so I feel like there was a missing piece in my life, because I never got those experiences."
"You made bad decisions that reverberated across generations of our families, did and said things you can’t take back and probably don’t even remember, but it is time to finally move on, I think. I want to thank you for making my family stronger, for making us cherish what we do have, and for allowing me to learn that people will hurt you in life, but it is possible to rise above it."
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