"You made bad decisions that reverberated across generations of our families, did and said things you can’t take back and probably don’t even remember, but it is time to finally move on, I think. I want to thank you for making my family stronger, for making us cherish what we do have, and for allowing me to learn that people will hurt you in life, but it is possible to rise above it."
When Sankari moved away from home in her twenties, she quickly found her confidence through self-expression. A spontaneous haircut lead to another, and then another, and another more. It didn't take long before she realised the implications of her actions and had to deal with the consequences.
"I can see, that even though my Nan was separated from her family, that we do have a lot of things that are culturally in line with being Aboriginal, and I don’t know how she just naturally grew up with those ideas, when she taken away so young, but she did. So I guess, I feel like a fraud either way, I don’t know which box to tick."
"Motherhood wasn’t something I enjoyed or embraced. I guess, you know, many Sri Lankan women do, so I thought it was something wrong with me. Yeah, so that was a catalyst for me, because I questioned–at 25 I didn’t know it was okay that I’m different, so I thought something was wrong with me, that this is part, half of who I am, but I could not relate, I did not belong, I did not make any connection to the Tamil of me, and as I said the women in particular. They were very nurturing, very ‘homemaker’ you know, but it didn’t resonate with me, it didn’t resonate with what I stood for, what I expected, what I enjoyed in life."
"I think identity is developed from what’s passed down to you, and how you interpret it, and how you implement it into your life, so I feel like there was a missing piece in my life, because I never got those experiences."
Ron Bradfield Junior is a saltwater fella from Bardi Country but grew up in Geraldton, WA. He now calls Whadjuk Boodjah, his home.
A man spends 20 years and travels 15,000 kms to find love and build a family in Perth.
A young woman who came to Australia as a refugee at the age of eight decides to be a doctor, a lawyer and a politician.
When Lesley’s fifth child Jack is born profoundly deaf, she and her family become unexpected and powerful advocates for CALD communities.
An eight year old girl resists dressing up in the Indian dress her mother has bought her for Multicultural Day. Thirty years later, she reflects on why.
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